Savannah Landmarks and Monuments

(Savannah, Georgia - GA, USA)




With such a rich and varied history, it is not difficult to appreciate how Savannah came to have such a large collection of monuments and historic landmarks. War is a predominant theme here and Savannah visitors with an interest in military conflict should head for the Colonial Cemetery and the Fort Pulaski National Monument.

Elsewhere in Savannah, restored period buildings make up a large percentage of the city's landmarks.



Eugene Talmadge Memorial Bridge


Opened in 1991, the stylish Talmadge Memorial Bridge spans the Savannah River and is around 3 km / 2 miles in length. Towering over 185 feet / 56 meters above the river with four lanes of traffic, the cable-stayed Talmadge Bridge replaced the city's previous cantilever truss bridge.
Open hours: daily
Admission: free

Green Meldrim House


Address: 14 West Macon Street, Savannah, Georgia GA, USA
Tel: +1 912 786 5787
Built in 1850, Savannah's Green Meldrim House is a rare but classic example of a Gothic Revival house. Visitors to the house can view the magnificent cast iron oriel windows and the ornately decorated fireplace mantles among other aesthetically pleasing architectural details.
Open hours: Tuesday, Thursday and Friday - 10:00 to 16:00, Saturday - 10:00 to 13:00
Admission: charge

Fort Pulaski National Monument


Address: Highway 80 East - heading for Tybee Island, Savannah, Georgia GA, USA
Tel: +1 912 786 5787
The Fort Pulaski National Monument is a historic coastal fort that played a significant role during the American Civil War. Set in a 5,600-acre / 2,266-hectare park, this important Savannah monument features a visitor center that chronicles the Civil War events that were of significance to the fort. Meanwhile, the parkland is home to a wide range of wildlife including alligators, raccoons, white-tailed deer and migratory birds.
Open hours: daily - 08:30 to 17:15
Admission: charge

City Hall


Address: 1 Bay Street, Savannah, Georgia GA, USA
Tel: +1 912 651 6410
Overlooking the Savannah River, the breathtaking City Hall dates back to 1901, when it was built on the site of Savannah's Old City Exchange building, the previous home of the City Government. The City Hall stands on the junction of Bay Street and Bull Street, and is immediately recognizable by its golden dome and grand architecture.
Open hours: daily
Admission: free

Hodgson Hall


Address: 501 Whitaker Street, Savannah, Georgia GA, USA
Tel: +1 912 651 2125
Hodgson Hall is a historic building constructed back in 1874 in order to pay tribute to the famous academic, William Brown Hodgson. Visitors to the hall can view its priceless collection of historical documents as well as appreciating the fine period architecture.
Open hours: daily
Admission: free

Colonial Cemetery


Address: 201 Abercorn Street / Oglethorpe Street, Savannah, Georgia GA, USA
The city's Colonial Cemetery is the city's oldest burial ground and is home to a number of monuments honoring some of the area's most noteworthy figures, including famous Button Gwinnett and General Lachlan McIntosh.
Open hours: daily - sunup to sundown
Admission: free

Henry Hall / Henry Street School


Address: 14115 West Henry Street, Savannah, Georgia GA, USA
Tel: +1 912 525 5100
Built in 1892, the Henry Street School is one of Savannah's most prominent examples of Queen Anne architecture. Constructed in a combination of limestone, terracotta and red brick, the building functioned as a junior high school until 1975. Some 11 years later, it was acquired by the Savannah College of Art and Design, who changed its named to Henry Hall.
Open hours: daily
Admission: free

King Tisdell Cottage


Address: 514 East Huntingson Street, Savannah, Georgia GA, USA
Tel: +1 912 234 8000
The King Tisdell Cottage dates back to 1896 and served as a residency for various Afro-American families before being earmarked for demolition in 1970. Fortunately, it was rescued by the city of Savannah and has since been renovated. King Tisdell Cottage is open to visitors who can view the classic period furnishings and idiosyncrasies that are typical of a middle-class black family home.
Open hours: daily - sunup to sundown
Admission: free






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