New Orleans Landmarks and Monuments

(New Orleans, Louisiana - LA, USA)




Given its rich and exciting history, there is no shortage of historical landmarks and monuments to explore in New Orleans, Louisiana.

The variety of sights is as eclectic as the city's character, from beautiful old houses of the past aristocracy and grand state buildings to impressive New Orleans cathedrals, above ground tombs of the city's cemeteries and the mighty Mississippi River.

Café Du Monde


Address: 800 Decatur St. (in the French Market, French Quarter), New Orleans, Louisiana LA, USA
Tel: +1 504 581 2914
With the original café having opened in 1862 on Jackson Square, Café Du Monde has become a New Orleans icon. Mentioned in several of Anne Rice's novels, a New Orleans experience is not complete without a café au lait and beignet while watching passers-by.
Open hours: daily, 24 hours
Admission: free


Garden District Houses


Address: Garden District, New Orleans, Louisiana LA, USA
The Garden District is home to glorious mansions and exquisite gardens that once belonged to the city's aristocracy and form some of New Orleans most famous landmarks. Popular houses include the White House, Joseph Morris House, Payne-Strachan House and Anne Rice's House.
Open hours: These are private residences but tours are available
Admission: charge for tours.

Madame John's Legacy


Address: 632 Dumaine Street, New Orleans, Louisiana LA, 70116, USA
Tel: +1 504 568 6968
This impressive state museum displays local folk art and architectural exhibits. Madame John's Legacy is one of the few surviving building of the devastating 1795 fires and is now a well preserved Creole home registered as a National Historic Landmark. Built in 1789, this building is a fine example of West Indian architecture and its walls reverberate with a colorful past.
Open hours: Tuesday to Sunday - 09:00 to 17:00
Admission: charge

Old Ursuline Convent


Address: 1110 Chartres Street, New Orleans, Louisiana LA, 70116, USA
Tel: +1 504 529 3040
Old Ursuline Convent is the oldest building in Louisiana, built in 1734 upon the orders of Louis XV of France, and is the only remaining building left over from the French Colonial Period in the country. The Ursuline nuns endured many hardships during the city's early days and their pioneering work was invaluable to the city's growth and development. The nuns introduced decent medical care, as well as the first school and an orphanage for girls. On occasion the signature collection is closed and replaced by a featured exhibition.
Open hours: Monday to Saturday - 10:00 to 16:00.
Admission: charge, discounts available for students and seniors, children under eight free. Tickets are sold at the gift shop / gate house located at 1112 Chartres Street.

Old US Mint


Address: 400 Esplanade Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana LA, 70116, USA
Tel: +1 504 568 6968
The Old US Mint was built in 1838 and is the only building to have served as both a national and confederate mint. Its stately walls now enclose the Newcomb College of Art and a popular jazz museum, with exhibits documenting the building's history.
Open hours: Tuesday to Sunday - 09:00 to 17:00
Admission: charge, discounts available for students and seniors, children under 13 free.

Lafayette Cemetery


Address: 1400 Washington Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana LA, 70130-5752, USA
Tel: +1 504 525 3377
New Orleans is famous for its cemeteries that consist of spooky above ground tombs that helped inspire the legends and stories surrounding voodoo and vampires. Lafayette Cemetery is the first of these cemeteries, opened in 1833, made famous by Anne Rice's 'Interview with the Vampire'. Once run down and decrepit, the New Orleans cemeteries are now a macabre, yet enthralling popular attraction. Joining a guided tour of the cemeteries is recommended.
Open hours: Monday to Friday - 07:30 to 14:30, Saturday - 07:30 to noon.
Admission: free

The Cabildo


Address: 749 Chartres Street, New Orleans, Louisiana LA, 70116, USA
Tel: +1 504 568 6990
The Cabildo was completed at the turn of the 18th century and originally acted as the seat of the Spanish Government in New Orleans. The building was restored after a 1988 fire by French artisans using traditional techniques and is now a major part of the Louisiana State Museum, documenting extensively the state's history. It is home to one of only two death masks of Napoleon and was the site of the signing of the Louisiana Purchase.
Open hours: Tuesday to Sunday - 09:00 to 17:00
Admission: charge, discounts available for students and seniors, children under 13 free






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